Seven Ways from Sundown (1960)

Seven Ways from Sundown (1960)
6.9
  • 833
  • Passed
  • Genre: Action
  • Release year: 1960 ()
  • Running time: 87 min
  • Original Title: Seven Ways from Sundown
  • Voted: 833

Audie Murphy is again the kid who puts on a badge to catch the bad guy, skillfully played by Barry Sullivan. On the way back to town the two develop a curiously close relationship - Sullivan passes up several chances to get away - but in the end Sullivan "asks for it" and Murphy obliges.

#PersonCharacters
1Audie MurphySeven Jones
2Barry SullivanJim Flood
3Venetia StevensonJoy Karrington
4John McIntireTexas Ranger Sergeant Henessey
  • It will be "Seven Ways From Sunday" ~ before UNIVERSAL ever releases a DVD!! by 7

    I will not take up space by reviewing what other Viewer's comments have already unanimously echoed -- this is a greatly overlooked and EXCELLENT Western 60's film (as are quite a few of AUDIE MURPHY's films). What I ask of UNIVERSAL DVD Productions is to .... PLEASE WAKE UP ... and to please release some of AUDIE MURPHY's films onto DVD! Did you know that almost NONE of his films have ever even been released onto VHS ... or ... DVD!! How absurd!! The ONLY times I have ever been able to even see these films were (recently) on TMC (a GREAT Channel!!) and several years ago on AMC (before they "sold out" to the Corporate conglomerates and SAVAGELY BUTCHERED their films with gross "commercialization" -- which is pretty SAD for a Company that boasted and prided itself in FILM RESTORATION and PRESERVATION!!). Here are a few of AUDIE's FINE Western titles which I offer to UNIVERSAL for consideration: SEVEN WAYS FROM SUNDOWN, HELL BENT FOR LEATHER, GUNS OF FORT PETTICOAT, COLUMN SOUTH, and RIDE CLEAR OF DIABLO. Thankfully, at least a few of his films ARE available on DVD ... and you should check them out or buy them -- you will NOT be disappointed: DUEL AT SILVER CREEK, NIGHT PASSAGE (with JAMES STEWART!), and NO NAME ON THE BULLET. These films can stand right up there and beside any of the other Classic Western Films!! Thanks for reading.

  • A lovable rogue is still a rogue. by 8

    Seven Ways From Sundown Jones (Audie Murphy) must bring in outlaw Jim Flood, who tries to win Jones over to his side with charm and a fun loving personality. Does Jones put friendship over justice? Does Flood underestimate the green lawman? Watch and see.

  • Audie Goes South by 7

    Everyone should see at least one Audie Murphy western in his life. This one is as good as any. Audie's a lawman charged with bringing elegant bad guy Barry Sullivan back to town in order to have him hanged. The problem is that, for all their difference, these two men become friends; and in time good friends. Sullivan teaches Audie a thing or two about life, and Audie gives Sullivan a lesson or two in morality. These guy complement one another. The dialogue is, for a low-budget western, often quite good. Everything happens as it should. The ending, while not a shocker, truly resonates, and makes us think about what we have just seen.

  • Well we all have our cross to bear. by 8

    Seven Ways from Sundown is directed by Harry Keller and adapted to screenplay by Clair Huffaker from his own novel of the same name. It stars Audie Murphy, Barry Sullivan, Venetia Stevenson, John McIntire and Kenneth Tobey. A UIP production in Eastman Color with music scored by William Lava & Irving Gertz (Joseph Gershenson supervising) and cinematography by Ellis Carter. Plot finds Murphy as Seven Ways from Sundown, a Texas Ranger who tracks and captures notorious outlaw Jim Flood (Sullivan). As the two men make their way back to Texas, a bond begins to form...

    It's another Audie Murphy Western that rarely gets a mention when the talk turns to Murphy's best Oaters. On this occasion, though, it's not because it is operating suspiciously at the low end of the "B" Western scale, or that it is boorish in the formula department, this is actually a case of it being under seen by the last couple of generations of Western fans. A shame because it has much to recommend.

    Film basically centres around the two (initial) polar opposite characters finding a mutual respect as they traverse the dusty land back to Texas. Along the way they encounter problems; Apache attack, bounty hunters et al, but they play cards, they fight, with both men getting ample opportunities to either escape or wound, but mostly they talk. Wonderful dialogue driven chat from the Huffaker (Rio Conchos/The Commancheros) pen. This isn't in the same league as the psychological smarts laden 3:10 to Yuma chatter between Heflin and Ford, no sir, but it's well scripted and boosted considerably by the chemistry between Murphy and Sullivan.

    It's an odd couple physically, especially in the early parts as Seven has Greenhorn traits to overcome, but the guy's odd friendship does become believable. When Seven says late in the day that there's no man he trusts more than Flood, we understand why, because Keller (Day of the Bad Man/Quantez) and Huffaker have done great work in bringing the characters and actors to life. There's extra spice in the beans, too, with knowledge given to us of what Flood has done with his guns and what Seven is irked by in his past, he has a calling but is it a burden?

    There's enough action in here to please the undemanding Western fan, with gun play, fist throws and show downs (look out for a nice stunt leap off of a wagon), while there's the odd smattering of heroism such as Audie saving a dog from a bird of prey! A potential romance angle (no not between the men) is very low key and not a hindrance, McIntire and Tobey impact nicely with their respective performances and Nevada's Red Rock Canyon forms a magnificent back drop (bravo Ellis Carter). But this is all about Murphy and Sullivan and the care and consideration afforded them by Messrs Keller and Huffaker. Far from perfect for sure, anyone will find holes in this sort of production, but forgiveness is not hard to come by when it plays out so damn well. Hey! The ending is a real beaut as well. 8/10

    Footnote: I viewed the film from British TV, Dave Channel. A lovely print that only makes me lament there's no widespread DVD release for this film. There is a very expensive Region 2 French DVD available from certain outlets, the quality of which I can't vouch for.

  • one for the money, two for the road, seven is a good western. by 9

    This is a better than average Audie Murphy western. Murphy is a ranger whose task is to capture an outlaw (Barry Sullivan). After the capture, a certain friendship starts developing between Murphy and Sullivan.It is a dangerous relationship for Murphy. Jim Flood(Sullivan) is a killer who will stop at nothing to get his way. Murphy's hardest choice will be not to let this friendship interfere in his deliverance of Flood to justice. Seven Days From Sundown is the peculiar name of Murphy's character. He comes from a family where each one of the brothers had a numerical name. The first was called "One For The Money" and the second "Two For The Road". Directed by Harry Keller who was very familiar with westerns both as an editor and director.

#PersonCrew
1Ellis W. Cartercinematographer
2Irving Gertzcomposer
3William Lavacomposer
4Harry Kellerdirector
5Gordon Kayproducer
6Clair Huffakerwriter